Urban District Identity as a Common Ingroup Identity: The Different Role of Ingroup Prototypicality for Minority and Majority Groups

In this paper we examined how identification with urban districts as an overarching identity (Gaertner & Dovido, 2000) and perceived ingroup prototypicality (Mummendey & Wenzel, 1999) influence the attitudes of residents toward other ethnic groups in their neighborhood. The overall conclusion of two field studies (N = 214 and N = 98) is that for majority-group members there may be a positive relation between identification with an overarching identity and outgroup attitudes, but only when they perceive their ingroup as low in prototypicality for the overarching group (Study 1 and 2). Conversely, for minority-group members there may be a positive relation between identification and outgroup attitudes, but only when they perceive their ingroup as high in prototypicality for the overarching group (Study 2). Outgroup prototypicality did not moderate the relation between identification and outgroup attitudes.

Citation
Ufkes, E. G., Otten, S., Van der Zee, K. I., Giebels, E., & Dovidio, J. F. (2012). Urban district identity as a common ingroup identity: The different role of ingroup prototypicality for minority and majority groups. European Journal of Social Psychology, 42 , 706-716. doi:10.1002/ejsp.1888.

Download paper
Download the (unedited) author’s copy of this paper here.

Disclaimer
Papers here are for academic purposes only and are not intended for mass dissemination or copying. Please refer to applicable fair use laws, including the restrictions from publication copyright holders.